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Publications Library

NTG-EDSD
Educational presentation given at the Winter Meeting of ACCSES held in Phoenix, AZ, on January 16, 2023. The presentation covers the medical aspects of dementia in adults with intellectual disability, co-incident conditions, therapeutic pharmaceuticals, biomarkers, and general health and medical practices. This is Part 2 of a three-part presentation session (Given by Dr Seth M. Keller).

Importance in Overall Health in Adults with Intellectual Disability and Dementia

Educational Presentation

Holingue et al. looked at identifying obstacles associated with screening and assessment of dementia among older adults with ID in a crisis-prone population. The NTG-EDSD was administered to enrollees aged 50 years and older in the START program. The authors noted that the NTG-EDSD provided a helpful way to collect information and document changes in the enrollees' functioning and that the NTG-EDSD may be helpful for capturing potential dementia-associated changes over time in crisis-prone adults with ID, though obstacles remain to the access of further evaluation for dementia.

Screening for dementia among adults with intellectual disability: Outcomes from a pilot study

Journal article

Ryan, M., Tuso, A., & Herge, A.. (2021). Usefulness of the NTG-EDSD: Evaluating the Validity of a Screening Tool for Dementia in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities. 

Doctorate of Occupational Therapy Program Capstone Presentations. Paper 22.

Usefulness of the NTG-EDSD: Evaluating the Validity of a Screening Tool for Dementia in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

Presentation

Abstract: The accuracy of the National Task Group-Early Detection Screen for Dementia (NTG-EDSD) was evaluated in a sample of 185 adults with Down syndrome (DS), emphasizing 'mild cognitive impairment (MCI-DS)'. Knowledgeable informants were interviewed with the NTG-EDSD, and findings were compared to an independent dementia status rating based on consensus review of detailed assessments of cognition, functional abilities and health status (including physician examination). Results indicated that sections of the NTG-EDSD were sensitive to MCI-DS, with one or more concerns within the 'Memory' or 'Language and Communication' domains being most informative.  The NTG-EDSD is a useful tool for evaluating dementia status, including MCI-DS. However, estimates of sensitivity and specificity, even for detecting frank dementia, indicated that NTG-EDSD findings need to be supplemented by additional sources of relevant information to achieve an acceptable level of diagnostic/screening accuracy.
Source: Silverman, W., Krinsky-McHale, S.J., Lai, F., Rosas, H.D., Hom, C., Doran, E., Pulsifer, M., Lott. I., Schupf, N, and Alzheimer’s Disease in Down Syndrome (ADDS) Consortium. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 2020, Dec 13. doi:10.1111/jar.12849.

Evaluation of the National Task Group-Early Detection Screen for Dementia: Sensitivity to 'Mild Cognitive Impairment' in Adults with Down Syndrome

Journal article

Walaszek et al. trained direct care workers, case managers, health-care providers, and other social services personnel on using the NTG-EDSD. After training, attendees reported a marked increase in confidence in their ability to track various health circumstances and detect functional decline in their clients. Authors noted that social and health-care professionals can learn to document signs of cognitive decline in adults with ID using the NTG-EDSD. The study participants were highly satisfied with the training, experienced an increase in confidence in their care of persons with ID, and found the NTG- EDSD feasible to use.

Effectively training professional caregivers to screen and refer persons with dementia and intellectual/developmental disability

Journal article

A report via a conference poster from the Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute where the NTG-EDSD was used to effectively train professional caregivers to screen and refer persons with dementia and intellectual disabilities.

AAIC 2020 Poster on NTG-EDSD

Conference poster

Wisconsin Alzheimer Institute at the University of Wisconsin held a training using the NTG-EDSD for administrative screening and enabling staff to construct dementia care plans.

Screening for Dementia in Persons with an Intellectual Developmental Disability

Resource document

Chapter 11: NTG-EDSD, in Neuropsychological Assessments of Dementia in Down Syndrome and Intellectual Disabilities, Vee P. Prasher, Editor.

NTG-EDSD - Book Chapter

Book chapter

Dementia diagnostics in people with learning difficulties (in German)

DEMENZ Article on NTG-EDSD (in German)

Journal article

Abstract: Background In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using the German-language version of a
recently developed screening tool for dementia for persons with intellectual disability (ID): the
National Task Group – Early Detection Screen for Dementia (NTG-EDSD). Some 221 paid carers of ageing persons with ID were asked to use the NTG-EDSD and report back on its utility and on 4 feasibility dimensions, and to provide detailed feedback on aspects deemed critical or missing.  All feasibility dimensions were rated good to very good, and 80% of respondents found the NTG-EDSD useful or very useful for the early detection of dementia. This highlights a high acceptability of this instrument by the main target group. The positive feasibility evaluation of the NTG-EDSD indicates the usability and adequacy
of this instrument for application of early detection of dementia in persons with ID.

Practical applications of the NTG-EDSD for screening adults with intellectual disability for dementia: A German-language version feasibility study 

Journal article

The British Psychological Society (updated version)
See page 27 for commentary on the NTG-EDSD.    Psychological Society.  (2015).  Dementia and People with Intellectual Disabilities: Guidance on the assessment, diagnosis, interventions and support of people with intellectual disabilities who develop dementia – Update.  Leicester, United Kingdom: Author.

Dementia and People with Intellectual Disabilities: Guidance on the Assessment, Diagnosis, Interventions and Support of People with Intellectual Disabilities Who Develop Dementia

Resource document

This version of the NTG guidelines, drawn from research, clinical experiences,  and demonstrated best practices is a popularized document (see also Jokinen et al, 2013 for the journal version). The guidelines delineate what actions should be undertaken and are presented in a manner that reflects the progressive nature of prevalent dementias. To enable the development of the most appropriate and useful services and care management for adults with intellectual disabilities affected by dementia, the guidelines are based upon the dementia staging model generally accepted for practice among generic dementia services. The staging model follows the flow from a prediagnosis stage when early recognition of symptoms associated with cognitive decline are recognized through to early, mid, and late stages of dementia, and characterizes the expected changes in behavior and function. To aid with widespread efforts to detect possible symptoms of MCI or dementia, the guidelines cite the application of the NTG-Early Detection Screen for Dementia as a first step in documenting early signs of cognitive and functional changes among people with intellectual disabilities. The guidelines also provide information on nonpharmacological options for providing community care for persons affected by dementia as well as commentary on abuse, financial,
managing choice and liability, medication, and nutritional issues.

Community Care and Supports for People with Intellectual Disabilities Affected by Dementia

Resource document

A new informative NTG-EDSD guidesheet is now available for primary care physicians who may be seeing an adult with an intellectual disability with possible cognitive decline. The guide explains what the NTG-EDSD is and what information it contains.

How to use the quick guide?

•	The NTG-EDSD is designed to help a clinician be informed about changes his/her patient may be experiencing.

•	As an agency staff or family member you should complete the NTG-EDSD based on your knowledge and observations of an adult with an intellectual disability. 

•	Bring the NTG-EDSD with you to the medical visit and also give the examiner the Quick Guide.

•	Be prepared to have some questions and discuss your notations on the NTG-EDSD with the examiner.

Physician's Quick Guide for Using the NTG-EDSD

Resource document

NADD Bulletin publication on the manual that accompanies the NTG-EDSD (original version)

NADD Bulletin article on NTG-EDSD

Journal article

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